Received from GCI (Game Changers International)
Martial Arts Organization. (I highly recommend that business dojo join this organization
for many similar "general interest" articles relating to dojo operations.  

 

SUCCESSFUL LIFE SKILLS FOR CHILDREN

SCHOOL SAFE

STREET SAFE

Instructor's Briefing & Overview Wheel

Head Instructor's Briefing, Overview & Outline

ABC's of Conflict Avoidance - Block #1 – Instructor's Instructions

Avoid Potentially Dangerous Situations

Be Calm / Breathe

Communicate With Confidence

Don't Make the Situation Worse

STRANGER ALERT - Block #2 - Instructor's Instructions

What is a Stranger?

What is a Lure? – Bribery & Job Lures

Assistance & Direction Lures

Internet Lures & Kids Are Strangers Too

FIVE Rules of Safety - Block #3 - Instructors Instructions

Use Your Mind – Create Safe Habits

Use Your Words

Use Your Legs

Ask For Help

TRUST YOUR INTUITION - Block #4 – Instructor's Instructions .

Who to Ask for Help

Boundary Setting

Good Touch/Bad Touch - No Secrets

If In Doubt – Get Out

 

 


 

School Safe/Street Safe

 

Instructor's Briefing & Overview Wheel

 

 

 

Most martial arts instructors are conscientious about teaching their students the most effective self-defense techniques they know. They usually have a clear cut system with which to teach self-defense to their students. Every conscientious martial arts instructor also tries to emphasize the importance of not fighting. What is lacking in many schools is a systematic method to teach our students how to “Not Fight,” as well as a systematiac way to teach skills that keep kids safe from potential preditors.

School Safe/Street Safe is a simple, comprehensive, easy to implement system of “Not Fighting” and living safely. The program is broken down into four one-month-long blocks, with each further divided into four weekly subjects, and is a perfect complement to all martial arts styles or self-defense systems.

The information is “cutting edge.” This is not some academic, philosophical approach to conflict avoidance. This program is practical, easy to follow, and the students love it. Every discussion topic has been tested and used in the classroom for years. It does not follow a lecture format. Generally there is a brief story, followed by a few questions and then role-playing.

Children learn from experience. School Safe/Street Safe lets them get practical life experience in the safety of your classroom. The four blocks of School Safe/Street Safe are:

The ABC's of Conflict Avoidance - primarily teaches avoidance strategies.

  1. Stranger Alert - teaches how to identify a lure and what to do.
  2. Five Rules of Personal Safety - teaches what to do when confronted (in the schoolyard) and how to resolve the situation peacefully.
  3. Trust Your Intuition - teaches practical techniques to fine-tune your students' awareness and intuition.

The system is easy to implement. Just allow five minutes during class to huddle up the kids, and follow the weekly outline. We have our Junior Instructors read the script until they have it memorized. Even beginning instructors will sound like pros!

Head Instructor's Briefing, Overview & Outline

 

BLOCK #1

ABC's Of Conflict Avoidance

Week #1 - Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations And Create Safe Habits

Week #2 - Be Calm/Breathe

Week #3 - Communicate With Confidence

Week #4 - Don't Make It Worse By Arguing or Fighting

 

BLOCK #2

STRANGER ALERT/No-Go-Yell-Tell

Week #1 - What Is A Stranger? There is a Difference Between Niceness and

Goodness.

Week #2 - What is a Lure?

•  Bribery Lure

•  Job Lure

Week #3 - What is a Lure? (continued)

•  Assistance Lure

•  Directions Lure

Week #4 - What is a Lure? (continued)

•  Internet Lure

•  Kids Are Strangers Too

BLOCK #3

FIVE Rules Of Personal Safety

Week #1 - Use Your Mind - Create Safe Habits

Week #2 - Use Your Words - How to Talk to a Bully

Week #3 - Use Your Legs - Chicken versus Coward

Week #4 - Ask For Help - Tell a Teacher/Tell a Parent/Tell a Friend

 

BLOCK #4

Trust Your INTUITION

Week #1 - Who to Ask for Help

Week #2 - Boundary Setting/Be Aware But Not on Guard

Week #3 - Good Touch/Bad Touch - No Secrets

Week #4 - If in Doubt...Out


 

ABC's of Conflict Avoidance - Block #1 – Instructor's Instructions

Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations

In this block, we will be discussing some simple guidelines that will help our students understand how they can be safe. Using the alphabet is an easy way to help memorize these steps. The ABC's of Conflict Avoidance are:

A = Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations

B = Be Calm/Breathe

C = Communicate With Confidence

D = Don't Make the Situation Worse by Fighting

At the beginning of every weekly discussion, you will review the ABC's with your students and have them memorize them. Then, each week for the next four weeks, you will discuss one of the ABC's in detail.

Students , especially young students, learn more, faster and retain information longer by listening to a short story or lesson, then answering a few well-placed questions, followed by role-playing (all taking five minutes or less). Whenever you ask a question, be sure to give the students time to answer.

Therefore, it is important that you solicit answers and get feedback from your students. You might have to have some patience or ask the question again in order to draw out the answer you want. Remember, the important part isn't so much the lecture, as it is getting your students to reason through the problem presented until they draw the conclusion you want.

When a student gives you an incorrect or wrong answer, keep your response positive . You might say “good try” or “almost” or “you're getting close.” If we make our students feel self-conscious or “dumb,” they will stop participating and this teaching method becomes ineffective.

 

Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations

ABC's of Conflict Avoidance (BLOCK #1) – Week 1 – Instructor's Script

This month we are going to discuss the ABC's of Conflict Avoidance. These are some simple steps that can help us stay safe.

A ” stands for “Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations.” Everybody say that with me.

B ” stands for “Be Calm/Breathe.” Everybody say that with me.

C ” stands for “Communicate With Confidence.” Everybody say that with me.

D ” stands for “Don't Make the Situation Worse by Arguing or Fighting.” Everybody say that with me.

This week we are going to talk about “ A ” which stands for Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations . What are some dangerous situations that we should avoid?

( Get feedback from your students… the following is what you might hear)

Busy Street

  1. Construction Site
  2. Vacant Lot
  3. Rushing River
  4. School Bully
  5. Talking with a grown-up you don't know when your parents aren't around.

Wow, those are potentially dangerous situations!

Why would you want to avoid these situations? (Solicit feedback from your students.)

So, in order to stay safe, we need to avoid them whenever possible. Everybody say, “Avoid a potentially dangerous situation.”

 

Be Calm / Breathe

 

ABC's of Conflict Avoidance (BLOCK #1) – Week 2 – Instructor's Script

Who can remember what the ABC's of Conflict Avoidance are?

A = Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations. Everybody say that with me.

B = Be Calm/Breathe. Everybody say that with me.

C = Communicate With Confidence. Everybody say that with me.

D = Don't Make the Situation Worse by Arguing or Fighting. Everybody say that with me.

This week we are going to talk about “ B ” which stands for “ Be Calm/Breathe .”

How many of you have ever been afraid? How many of you have ever been angry? When you are angry or afraid, do you think clearly? No. When you are not thinking clearly, do you make good choices? No.

Let's think about how we breathe when we are angry. It's usually shallow and quick breathes. Our breathing is very similar when we are afraid. When you are calm and relaxed, your breathing is slower and deeper.

If you ever want to talk your way out of a bad situation, then you must calm down to be able to think clearly. The easiest way to calm yourself down is to take slow deep breaths.

Let's try it! Imagine you are angry. Breathe like you're angry; stand like you're angry. Now stop and tell yourself to relax as you breathe slowly and deeply.

Now imagine that you are really afraid. Breathe like you are afraid; stand like you are afraid. Now stop and tell yourself to relax as you breathe slowly and deeply.

Remember to try this the next time you are angry or afraid and want to calm down.

One more time - everybody say it with me “Be Calm/Breathe.”

 

Communicate With Confidence

 

ABC's of Conflict Avoidance (BLOCK #1) – Week 3 – Instructor's Script

Who can remember what the ABC's of Conflict Avoidance are?

A = Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations. Everybody say that with me.

B = Be Calm/Breathe. Everybody say that with me.

C = Communicate With Confidence. Everybody say that with me.

D = Don't Make the Situation Worse by Arguing or Fighting. Everybody say that with me.

This week we are going to talk about “ C ” which stands for “ Communicate With Confidence .”

Bullies and strangers usually approach people who don't look very confident. How does someone stand who isn't very confident? Where are their eyes? What do they sound like when they talk? Usually they stand with their head and eyes down and shoulders drooping. They probably speak weakly.

How does someone who is confident stand? Where are his eyes? What do they sound like when they talk? Usually they stand with their shoulders back and their head up. They make eye contact and speak with a clear, strong voice.

Let's try it! Everybody stand like you're afraid or not confident. Drop your shoulders, turn your head down and look towards the floor. Now speak to your classmates in a weak voice. How does this make you feel?

Now everybody stand like you are super confident. Bring your shoulders back, your chin up and focus your eyes. Now speak to your classmates in a confident voice. How do you feel now?

Remember, you can practice acting confident, even when you don't feel confident. Looking and acting confident doesn't guarantee that no one will bother you. It just makes them less likely to.

 

Don't Make the Situation Worse

By Arguing or Fighting

ABC's of Conflict Avoidance (BLOCK #1) – Week 4 – Instructor's Script

Who can remember what the ABC's of Conflict Avoidance are?

A = Avoid Potentially Dan gerous Situations. Everybody say that with me.

B = Be Calm/Breathe. Everybody say that with me.

C = Communicate With Confidence. Everybody say that with me.

D = Don't Make the Situation Worse by Arguing or Fighting. Everybody say that with me.

This week we are going to talk about “ D ” which stands for “ Don't put yourself in a worse situation by arguing or fighting .”

Most of us have been in an argument with a friend or brother or sister or mom or dad. Usually what happens is one person raises their voice, then the other, then pretty soon both people are yelling at each other. They almost always end up saying something that they will regret later. Once you say something mean, you can't un-say it.

Imagine that saying something mean is like pounding a nail into a wall. You can take the nail out (apologize), but you still leave a hole in the wall.

What are some things you can do to keep from arguing? Solicit some feedback - then give them these options:

  1. Take 10 deep breathes.
  2. Walk away.
  3. Try to understand their viewpoint.
  4. Ask to talk to them later, after you've both cooled down.

Ask for volunteers and then roll play with one or more of these options.

The next time an argument starts, see if you can remember one of these methods before it gets bad.

 

STRANGER ALERT - Block #2 - Instructor's Instructions

 

This month we are going to discuss stranger awareness (stranger alert). Some well-intentioned people think that “don't talk to strangers” is good advice, but it is incomplete and confusing at best.

Our children are taught to not talk to strangers, but then are reprimanded when they don't answer politely when a grown up they don't know speaks to them

In this block, we will be talking about what a stranger is, what a lure is, and the No-Go-Yell-Tell method of defense.

STRANGER ALERT/No-Go-Yell-Tell

Week #1 - What Is A Stranger? There is a Difference Between Niceness and

Goodness.

Week #2 - What is a Lure?

•  Bribery Lure

•  Job Lure

Week #3 - What is a Lure? (continued)

•  Assistance Lure

•  Directions Lure

Week #4 - What is a Lure? (continued)

•  Internet Lure

•  Kids Are Strangers Too

Remember, students , especially young students, learn faster and retain information longer, by listening to a short story or lesson, then answering a few well-placed questions, followed by role-playing (all taking five minutes or less). Whenever you ask a question, be sure to give the students time to answer.

Again, it is important that you solicit answers and get feedback from your students. You might have to have some patience or ask the question again to draw out the answer you want. Remember the important part isn't so much the lecture, as it is getting your students to reason through the problem presented until they draw the conclusion you want.

When a student gives you an incorrect or wrong answer, keep your response positive . You might say “good try” or “almost” or “you're getting close.” If we make our students feel self-conscious or “dumb,” they will stop participating and this teaching method becomes ineffective.

 

 

What is a Stranger?

 

STRANGER ALERT/No-Go-Yell-Tell (Block #2) – Week 1 – Instructor's Script

What is a Stranger? There is a Difference Between Niceness and Goodness.

This month we will be talking about “Stranger Alert,” lures, and the NO-GO-YELL-TELL four steps to safety.

Who can tell me what a stranger is? Are they big? Mean? Ugly? Do they wear funny clothes?

(Get Feedback)

Actually, a stranger is anyone you don't know until your parents tell you otherwise. Is a nice grandma that you haven't met a stranger? Yes. What about a store clerk? Yes. If they are strangers, does that make them bad? No. As a matter of fact, most people that act nice are nice and most strangers are good people. But there is a difference between niceness and goodness. Some people might act nice just to get what they want. For this reason, we should always be careful around people we don't know.

Everybody say NO! “NO!”

Everybody say GO! “GO!”

Everybody say YELL! “YELL!”

Everybody say TELL! “TELL!”

Next week we will be talking about how to use these steps if you ever feel uncomfortable or threatened by a stranger.

 

What is a Lure? – Bribery & Job Lures

 

No/Go/Yell/Tell (BLOCK #2) – Week 2 – Instructor's Script

Last week we talked about stranger alert. Who can tell me what a stranger is? That's right, anyone you don't know until your parents tell you otherwise.

This week we are going to talk about lures. Lures are tricks that people might use to get you to go with them when they know you shouldn't.

The first lure we are going to talk about is the bribery lure . This is when someone tells a child that they will give him or her a toy or candy if they will come with them. Remember, good people know that it isn't right to do this, and would never ask you to go with them.

Let's practice what to do if this ever happened. I'll be the stranger.

(Use different scenarios such as in the park, at the mall, in the front yard, etc.)

Stranger – “Hello, would you like a candy bar? I have one just around the corner. Come with me and I'll give you one.”

First, you should say “ NO !” loudly. Then you GO , which means you run away as fast as you can. As you are running, YELL “Stranger! Stranger!” Then TELL a grownup what happened.

Another lure is the job lure . This is when someone offers to pay you money if you help them with something. Remember, good people know this is not right and would never ask you to do this.

Let's practice this one. I'll be the stranger. (Just as before, use different scenarios.)

Stranger – “Excuse me, I need some help getting some boxes out of my car. I'll pay you $5.00 if you help.”

First, you should say “ NO !” loudly. Then you GO , which means you run away as fast as you can. As you are running, YELL “Stranger! Stranger!” Then TELL a grownup what happened.

Chances are these lures won't ever happen to you. But if it does happen, remember NO-GO-YELL-TELL .

 

Assistance & Direction Lures

 

No/Go/Yell/Tell (BLOCK #2) – Week 3 – Instructor's Script

 

Let's review what a stranger is. Who would like to tell me who a stranger is?

(Get Feedback)

That's right. A stranger is anyone you don't know until your parent tells you otherwise.

Let's review what a lure is. Who would like to tell me what a lure is?

(Get Feedback)

That's right. A lure is when someone tries to trick you into going with them when they know that you shouldn't.

This week we are going to talk about two more lures. The first one is the assistance lure . Remember, good people know that it is not right to ask kids for help, so they would never ask.

Let's practice. I'll be the stranger. (Just as before, use different scenarios)

Stranger – “Pardon me, but can you help me find my puppy? I think he might be in the bushes over there but I'm too big to go in there. Could you try?”

First, you should say “ NO !” loudly. Then you GO , which means you run away as fast as you can. As you are running, YELL “Stranger! Stranger!” Then TELL a grownup what happened.

The next lure is called the direction lure . Do grownups ask kids for directions? No.

Let's practice. I'll be the stranger. (Just as before, use different scenarios.)

Stranger – “Hello over there. I'm looking for McDonalds. Could you come over here a little closer and tell me where it is?”

First, you should say “ NO !” loudly. Then you GO , which means you run away as fast as you can. As you are running, YELL “Stranger! Stranger!” Then TELL a grownup what happened.

Chances are these lures won't ever happen to you. But if it does happen, remember NO-GO-YELL-TELL .

 

Internet Lures & Kids Are Strangers Too

 

No/Go/Yell/Tell (BLOCK #2) – Week 4 – Instructor's Script

Let's review what a stranger is. Who would like to tell me who a stranger is?

(Get Feedback)

That's right. A stranger is anyone you don't know until your parent tells you otherwise.

Let's review what a lure is. Who would like to tell me what a lure is?

(Get Feedback)

That's right. A lure is when someone tries to trick you into going with them when they know that you shouldn't.

Internet Lures

This week we are going to talk about the Internet Lure. Do you know what a chat room is? That's right, it's a place that people go on their computer to talk to other people that are online. Can chat rooms be dangerous? Absolutely! Why? That's right, because people can pretend to be someone that they are not. Should you ever meet someone personally that you talked to online? Of course not. The only exception would be if your parents went with you. Also, should you ever give out personal information such as where your parents work? Of course not. Can NO-GO-YELL-TELL still work with the Internet? Yes, it's basic format is the same. NO-GO-YELL-TELL = Leave the chat room and tell a responsible grownup.

Kids Are Strangers Too

Are strangers only adults or are kids strangers too? Kids can be strangers too. Could a kid try to use a lure on you? Yes, that's why you should never go anywhere with another child unless your parents know the child AND you have your parents' permission. Precautions like those help us to be safe.

So, one more time, let's review the way we would handle an attempted lure. Everybody say NO-GO-YELL-TELL .


 

FIVE Rules of Safety - Block #3 - Instructors Instructions

 

This block is designed for dealing with school and neighborhood scenarios. It covers many of the same topics as “The ABC's of Conflict Avoidance,” but with a slightly different emphasis. The five steps allow for a lot of different circumstances and role-playing scenarios.

The FIVE Rules Of Personal Safety are as follows:

Step #1 - Use Your Mind - Create Safe Habits

Step #2 - Use Your Words - How to Talk to a Bully

Step #3 - Use Your Legs - Chicken versus Coward

Step #4 - Ask For Help - Tell a Teacher/Tell a Parent/Tell a Friend

Step #5 – Defend Yourself (As a last resort)

  Step 5 will not be discussed in much detail as it is most likely covered in your curriculum already.

Remember, students , especially young students, learn more, faster and retain information longer by listening to a short story or lesson, then answering a few well-placed questions, followed by role-playing (all taking five minutes or less). Whenever you ask a question, be sure to give the students time to answer

Again, it is important that you solicit answers and get feedback from your students. You might have to have some patience or ask the question again in order to draw out the answer you want. Remember the important part it isn't so much the lecture, as it is getting your students to reason through the problem presented until they draw the conclusion you want.

When a student gives you an incorrect or wrong answer, keep your response positive . You might say “good try” or “almost” or “you're getting close.” If we make our students feel self-conscious or “dumb,” they will stop participating and this teaching method becomes ineffective.

 

Use Your Mind – Create Safe Habits

 

5 Rules Of Personal Safety (BLOCK #3) – Week 1 – Instructor's Script

This month we will be talking about the Five Rules of Personal Safety . They are (repeat after me):

Use Your Mind

•  Use Your Words

  1. Use Your Legs
  2. Ask For Help
  3. Defend Yourself

This week we will discuss Step 1 – Use Your Mind

Use Your Mind means thinking about all of the things that you can do to stay safe. It means to create safe habits. Tell me what safe habits you have?

(Get Feedback)

Tell me what safe habits should you have?

(Get Feedback)

(The following is a list of possible safe habits they should have.)

  1. Always use your seat belt
  2. Avoid bullies
  3. Look both ways before you cross the street
  4. Never dive into water until you know how deep it is
  5. Think of ways to make friends with bullies

So, always try to use your mind to create safe habits and stay out of trouble. Your life will be a lot more enjoyable.

 

Use Your Words

 

5 Rules Of Personal Safety (BLOCK #3) – Week 2 – Instructor's Script

Who can tell me what the Five Rules of Personal Safety are?

(Get Feedback)

Ok, everybody repeat after me.

Use Your Mind

•  Use Your Words

  1. Use Your Legs
  2. Ask For Help
  3. Defend Yourself

This week we are going to discuss Step 2 – Use Your Words

Using your words means being able to talk your way out of trouble. Let's imagine that a school bully came up to you and started teasing you. What could you say to get him to stop?

Look him in the eye and confidently ask him to stop.

  1. Change the subject by asking him about his favorite sport.
  2. Agree with him.

Let's practice. I'll be the school bully.

Bully – “Hey kid, you sure do have a stupid shirt.”

Student Response #1 – “I'd appreciate it if you didn't make fun of my clothing. Thank you.”

Student Response #2 – “Isn't your favorite sport baseball? You sure are a good player. Could

you help me work on my catching some time?”

Student Response #3 – “I know it's a stupid shirt, but what can I say? My mom makes me wear it”.

Ok, now it is someone else's turn. Bring two kids up and have them role-play the previous scenario.

Will one of these approaches always work? Of course not. But it could work, so it is worth a try.

 

Use Your Legs

 

5 Rules Of Personal Safety (BLOCK #3) – Week 3 – Instructor's Script

Who can tell me what the Five Rules of Personal Safety are?

(Get Feedback)

Ok, everybody repeat after me.

Use Your Mind

•  Use Your Words

  1. Use Your Legs
  2. Ask For Help
  3. Defend Yourself

This week we are going to discuss Step 3 – Use Your Legs

Sometimes you need to stand your ground. Sometimes the best thing to do to stay safe is run. We are going to talk about when to run.

Some people will tell you that running away makes you a chicken. Remember, it's okay to be a chicken… that just means you're afraid. Sometimes, the smartest thing you can do is be afraid and run. There is a difference between being a chicken and being a coward. A chicken just runs away from a dangerous situation. A coward is someone who won't stand up for what they believe in.

When should you run? Any time you are confronted by someone who is being mean to you, who you don't know, and who you will probably never see again. You could be at a park, mall, fair, sport field, etc.

Could you stand your ground and try to talk your way out of a situation? Certainly. And if you were going to see the person again, it would probably be a good idea. But it isn't necessary, because you're not going to see them again. So being safe and running away is a great choice.

Is there another good time to run? Yes! When using your words isn't working and you feel a fight coming on and you feel that you can get away, then get away- RUN if necessary!

Let's practice. I'll be the bad guy. You're at a park playing by yourself.

Bad Guy – “Hey twerp, get over here so I can knock your block off.”

(Have the student practice running away.)

Remember, sometimes it is okay to be a chicken and run.

 

Ask For Help

 

5 Rules Of Personal Safety (BLOCK #3) – Week 4 – Instructor's Script

Who can tell me what the Five Rules of Personal Safety are?

(Get Feedback)

Ok, everybody repeat after me.

Use Your Mind

•  Use Your Words

  1. Use Your Legs
  2. Ask For Help
  3. Defend Yourself

This week we are going to discuss Step 4 – Ask For Help

Most kids don't want to be a tattletale. They are afraid that if they tell a parent or teacher about a bully or troublemaker, other kids will make fun of them. Asking for help in advance might be the solution. Here is how it works.

Let's pretend that there is someone who is constantly teasing you, or threatening to beat you up all the time. Ask to meet with your teacher or yard duty attendant at a time when other kids can't see you. Ask if they can keep an eye out for you and the bully during recess. You can bet that they will keep a close eye on the situation. If they helped you, they did so because they saw what happened, and you don't look like a tattletale.

Let's try it. I'll be the teacher and one of you can approach me and ask me for help. It will sound something like this:

Student – “Pardon me, Mr. Smith. Joey has been picking on me and says he is going to beat me up next recess. I don't want to be a tattletale, but I am worried about my safety. Could you keep an eye out for me during recess?”

Remember, it is okay to ask for help. Your safety is important to your parents and teachers, so don't be afraid to tell them what is going on.


 

TRUST YOUR INTUITION - Block #4 – Instructor's Instructions

 

In this block, we are going to work with our students on the importance of listening to their intuition; how to train their intuition to better sense danger, and teach them practical strategies for staying safe.

The block will be broken into four weekly lessons:

Week #1 - What To Do If You Are Lost

Week #2 - Boundary Setting/Be Aware But Not On Guard

Week #3 - Good Touch/Bad Touch - No Secrets From Parents

Week #4 - If In Doubt...Out

Remember, students , especially young students, learn more, faster and retain information longer by listening to a short story or lesson, then answering a few well-placed questions, followed by role-playing (all taking five minutes or less). Whenever you ask a question, be sure to give the students time to answer

Therefore, it is important that you solicit answers and get feedback from your students. You might have to have some patience or ask the question again in order to draw out the answer you want. Remember the important part it isn't so much the lecture, as it is getting your students to reason through the problem presented until they draw the conclusion you want.

When a student gives you an incorrect or wrong answer, keep your response positive , you might say “good try” or “almost” or “you're getting close.” If we make our students feel self-conscious or “dumb,” they will stop participating and this teaching method becomes ineffective.

 

What to do if You Are Lost

(Who to Ask for Help )

 

TRUST YOUR INTUITION - BLOCK #4 – Week 1 – Instructor's Script

 

The thought of getting lost is scary. Most kids have been told to not talk to strangers and probably would not have any idea what to do if they were lost or separated from their family. This week we are going to talk about what to do if you get lost or need help. It will probably never happen, but it is good to have a plan just in case.

If you are lost or need help for some reason, should you wait for somebody to come up to you to see if you need help? (Get Feedback) Or should you ask someone for help? (Get Feedback) You should definitely ask someone for help. The question is who? Let's assume there are lots of grownups around, but you don't know any of them, and there are no policemen to be seen. Who should you ask? (Get Feedback)

The first choice would be a mom with kids.

The second choice should be someone that looks like a grandma.

The third choice would be someone in uniform (mailman, milkman, UPS driver, etc)

The fourth choice would be a person working.

Why do you think someone that looks like a grandma or mom with kids is our first choice? Because they have what is called “Maternal Intuition,” which means moms and grandmas usually care lots about kids and would want to help.

A person in a uniform or a person working are good choices because they are probably pretty responsible and will most likely be willing to help.

If you are lost or need help, never go with someone who approaches you, especially if they make you feel scared or afraid

Let's review again who you would ask for help:

A mom with kids.

  1. Someone that looks like a grandma.
  2. A person in uniform (mailman, milkman, UPS driver, etc)
  3. A person working.

 

Boundary Setting

 

TRUST YOUR INTUITION - BLOCK #4 – Week 2 – Instructor's Script

Boundary Setting/Be Aware But Not On Guard

This week we are going to discuss Boundary Setting and Awareness . How many of you feel that you should always be looking for bad guys and always be ready for trouble?

(Get Feedback)

If you lived like this, you would be what we call “on guard.” Being on guard all the time would actually not be a good idea. First off, it would be no fun. But more importantly, it would work against you. Because when you're always on guard, your intuition won't work as well, so you wouldn't be able to tell the difference between real danger and imaginary danger.

Everybody say “Be Aware But Not On Guard.” This means we always try to be aware of what is going on around us, but not fearful. If you are aware, but not on guard, your intuition will tell you if there is danger.

If you ever feel danger, boundary setting is important. Boundary setting is about having a safety zone between you and whatever the danger is. Imagine a big, mean, barking dog. If it is behind a glass door, you probably aren't too afraid. If there is no door between you and the dog, you are probably going to be much more scared. The door represents a safety zone. Distance can also be a safety zone.

If someone who makes you uncomfortable ever approaches you, never let that person get closer than within three steps. That is your personal safety zone. Any closer than that and they can grab you or hit you. If they come closer than that, you step back and say “No, back off,” as you put your hands up.

Let's try it. I'll be the bad guy. When I come at you, what do you do? Say, “No, back off,” as you put your hands up.

Remember, the trick is to be aware, but not on guard.

 

Good Touch/Bad Touch - No Secrets

 

TRUST YOUR INTUITION - BLOCK #4 – Week 3 – Instructor's Script

This week we are going to talk about Good Touch/Bad Touch - No Secrets

Who is the boss of your body? You! And no one has the right to touch you in a way that makes you feel funny or uncomfortable.

What is a good touch?

  1. A hug from a parent.
  2. A handshake from a friend.
  3. A pat on the back from a teacher.

Everyone appreciates and needs contact with other people. Babies can literally get sick from not being held and loved. Good touch is any kind of contact that makes you feel good about yourself.

Don't ask what bad touch is because you can't control what students might say, and they might say something inappropriate.

 

Bad touch is when someone touches you in a way that makes you feel funny or uncomfortable. Bad touch can be anywhere on the body, but especially when someone touches you on parts of the body normally covered by your swimming suit.

Who is the boss of your body? You! And no one has the right to touch you in a way that makes you feel funny or uncomfortable. It will probably never happen to you, but if it ever does, what should you do? You look them in the eye and say, “Stop touching me right now.” Then tell another grownup what happened.

Everybody say “No Secrets.” No secrets means if someone touches you wrong, always tell another grownup what happened, even if you were told not to.

Remember, who is the boss of your body? YOU ARE!

 

If In Doubt – Get Out

 

TRUST YOUR INTUITION - BLOCK #4 – Week 4 – Instructor's Script

 

For the past few weeks, we have been talking about how to ask for help. We have talked about boundary setting and awareness. Last week we talked about good touch/bad touch/no secrets.

This week we are going to talk about “ If In Doubt…Out .”

Everybody say “If In Doubt…Out.” This means that you always trust your intuition. Intuition is a feeling that you have about places or people that you just can't quite explain. It's when someone gives you the creeps or when being somewhere makes you feel uncomfortable. Your intuition is there to help warn and protect you from danger. You should always listen to your intuition.

Everyone say, “My safety is more important than their feelings.” This means that if you ever feel uncomfortable with someone or someplace, you leave and find help. Even if this means hurting someone else's feelings.

Once again, say “If In Doubt…Out.” Now say “My safety is more important than their feelings.”

Remember to always trust your intuition.

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Copyright 2002 by Dave and Tim Kovar